Search Results

Share Article:

Facebook Twitter Linkedin Mail

Tag: innovation

A new frontier of innovation with advanced remote operations

Business and Enterprise

Posted on October 4, 2019

3 min read

I’m always impressed at our team’s ability to solve problems using our networks in the pursuit of a better future for our customers, and for their customers. Today we’re unveiling a new frontier in remote operations.

Through our ongoing partnership with leading geospatial specialist Fugro, we’ve developed the ROC, or Remote Operations Centre. Based in Perth at our International Telecommunications Centre, the ROC is helping to service Fugro’s maritime operations off the coast of Western Australia in a whole new way thanks to satellites, automation and innovation.

Using our satellite network, we are working with skilled Fugro engineers to operate a fleet of maritime submersible robots. These drones beam high-definition video to remote operators in Perth from an incredible depth. Paired with the range of our satellite network, Fugro could deploy this remote drone capability to anywhere on Earth – from the coasts of Africa through to the shores of the Americas.

These robots will operate up to 4000 metres below the surface of some of the roughest oceans in the world, with duties including the remote inspection, repair and maintenance of Fugro infrastructure.

Prior to the deployment of the ROC and its fleet of subsea satellite drones, Fugro would need to deploy a manned vessel into the area to control the monitoring equipment. This presented a challenge, as crews would need to contend with rough conditions and harsh environments.

This use of satellite technology means greater efficiency for partners like Fugro, but also means greater levels of workplace safety, as it reduces the need for crewed boats to visit subsea infrastructure. Fugro can now maintain its subsea assets off the coast of Western Australia, including oil and gas resources, telecommunications cables and more.

This incredible application of our networks to the cutting-edge sector of remote robotics holds incredible potential for other industries. We’re already investigating future opportunities for the ROC in the wider market.

Industries like mining, agriculture and even those in the space sector could benefit from remote monitoring and maintenance. Any industry contending with a harsh or remote environment could benefit from the capabilities and applications we’ve created at the ROC.

We’re excited to share the work of our partnership with Fugro with other customers and industries, including the potential of using our Remote Operations Centre as a hub for innovation that can support the development of joint government and industry automation initiatives.

We truly believe we’ve uncovered a rich vein of economic opportunity for jobs and growth in the Western Australian and national economies.

Bringing our business technology expertise to more customers across Melbourne

Business and Enterprise

Posted on August 28, 2019

3 min read

The first Telstra Business Technology Centre to be rolled out in Victoria is now open – with our new Melbourne City centre providing expert information, personalised service and ongoing support to our small business customers from the iconic Rialto building on Collins Street.

I was proud to officially open the Telstra Business Technology Centre at Melbourne City today, and to meet the dedicated team of experts who will be available both for walk-ins and by appointment to offer a one-stop-shop for advice to our small and medium-sized business partners.

Our Business Technology Centres are designed with the needs of business owners and operators in mind – no matter how simple or how complex their operations are. The staff at our Centres are highly trained with expertise in our small business solutions, whether you need to set up a website or e-commerce store, if you want a cloud service for your digital operations, or if you have more traditional needs like fixed broadband or mobile services.

The Melbourne City store is one of the 28 Telstra Business Technology Centres that we are opening around the country this year, providing bespoke support and advice to our small and medium business customers on the technology their operations need to succeed.

There are over 9000 of our small and medium business customers in the area surrounding this new Business Technology Centre in Melbourne, so we know there is a strong demand for this kind of personalised support. We know that the needs of small and medium-sized businesses are constantly changing and evolving as technology evolves, and we know you want guidance on the best and most effective ways to grow their operations.

Telstra Business Technology Centre Melbourne

Our ongoing partnership with cloud technology provider Oreta means that our Melbourne City centre can address the increasingly complex technology needs of businesses, with experts on hand in cloud services, security and multi-site networks for larger operations. An experience centre inside our new offices will also showcase the latest technology and solutions from our partners, including products from Cisco, Microsoft and Google. Telstra and Oreta have grown their relationship over time. Now, as a full-service partner, Oreta is a trusted business advisor for Telstra’s customers bringing together technology vendors and Telstra’s world-class connectivity to deliver genuine customer-centric solutions to meet the unique needs of business customers.

We’ve also recently launched Account Management Support for all our small business customers, irrespective of their size or their spend with us. We hope this is a boon for time-poor business owners – by offering them personalised support from a specialised team with extended operating hours, we want to take the burden of managing Telstra services off the hands of business owners to give them more to run their business more effectively. We will continue to roll out our Telstra Business Technology Centres around Australia throughout this year and the next. We’ve made many changes to the way we work with small business as part of our T22 strategy, and we’re always listening to better understand the needs of customers now and in the future.

Telstra Business Technology Centre Melbourne

Challenging the next generation of innovative thinkers

Tech and Innovation

Posted on August 22, 2019

4 min read

Rapid advances in technology are fundamentally changing the nature of work – from the jobs that exist to the way work is done. Research by the Committee for Economic Development (CEDA) estimates almost 40 per cent of jobs that exist today have a moderate to high likelihood of disappearing in the next 10 to 15 years. On the flip slide, there will also be jobs that don’t yet exist. All of which makes preparing for the future of work critical.

Understandably, when many people think about the skills needed in the future, they think about coding, software engineering and cyber security. What you might not immediately consider are some of the human skills that will be important. We’ll be living in a software and social future where a combined STEM and social sciences background will be crucial ingredients for success. Think communication, complex problem solving, creativity, collaboration and emotional intelligence.

For example, building the world’s best cloud or AI technology will be important. But so will be finding the best way to collaborate – by leveraging multidisciplinary teams and partnerships, within companies or across companies, to drive new revenue and market opportunities for the businesses they are a part of. In the same vein, being able to analyse data will be important, but so too will the ability to interpret it, make informed assumptions and be able to communicate it in a way that is easily understood and applicable to customer requirements.

We’re committed to building a future-ready workforce and helping equip the next generation with the skills they’ll need. As part of this, we recently partnered with the University of Technology Sydney to give students insight into the disruptions facing businesses across industries and challenge them to test and explore how an organisation could build an inclusive and future-ready workforce.

Split into three groups, 150 students from the Faculty of Transdisciplinary Innovation were asked to outline how they would build an engaged future workforce, considering career opportunity and growth, diversity and inclusion, and the role education partnerships would play. 

UTS Student Challenge
Claudia Pilon-Summons tells the Telstra panel how her team worked together, admitting that doing a group Nutbush showed the value of play and helped the team work better together.

In considering career opportunity and growth, the first group focused on career strategies and recommended a skills platform that would facilitate lateral moves into other areas of an organisation beyond team boundaries. Part of their consideration was also creating a safe environment where it would be okay to try something new like moving into a totally different role and failing in doing so.

The second group looked at workplace diversity and inclusion. A big part of their focus was the role of inclusive language in improving culture, such as referring to ‘balanced’ teams over ‘diverse’ teams; ‘mentors’ over ‘managers’ – and they pitched algorithmic hot desking to reshuffle social groups and enable natural diversity.

UTS Student Challenge
Aston presents division two’s approach to maintaining diversity in an organisation undergoing great change.

The challenge’s third group looked at how businesses could partner with education institutions to attract and retain diverse talent. Part of their proposal included immersing students and employees in transdisciplinary teams that focused on rotations and projects that build breadth of experience to develop in-demand skills.

UTS Student Challenge
Phoebe Wynn-Jones and Luke Castaldi led the group in an exercise demonstrating the process of self-organisation showing that while the vision may be clear, the path to get there isn’t.

The students used creative thinking, innovation and complex problem-solving – capabilities that are highly valued now and will be into in the future.

Thank you to the students from UTS for stepping up to the challenge. Your recommendations showed the importance of embracing technology, making diversity and inclusion central to business thinking, and understanding social trends and employee needs to adapt and be future-ready.

Considering challenges like this will help future Australian business leaders prepare for disruptions, and understand how those disruptions will flow on to change an organisation, its workplace culture and employee expectations.

We look forward to continuing to partner with a range of education institutions – from schools to vocational education providers and universities – to build the skills needed for the future and a strong talent pipeline for Australia.  

Making our roads safer with connected vehicles

5G

Posted on June 24, 2019

3 min read

Ever since we began planning for the roll out of 5G in Australia, we’ve been talking about the potential impact it would have on the future of autonomous vehicles. Today we’re bringing a little bit of that future to our Cellular V2X project in partnership with VicRoads and Lexus. 

Making our roads safer in Australia is more than just a goal – it’s a necessity. Victoria’s Towards Zero plan is designed to ensure that the state’s road toll is constantly pushed towards the vision of zero deaths and serious injuries. That’s why we’re proud to put our tech towards saving lives on the road working with Lexus on the Advanced Connected Vehicles Victoria (or ACV2) project.

We have just demonstrated this technology to the public for the first time today, and on-road testing of these connected vehicles will now commence in Victoria – so keep an eye out!

By optimising our network, we’re able to create a system that goes beyond simply connecting vehicles to each other – instead also connecting them to existing road network infrastructure. We’re able to use the fast, low-latency cellular ‘vehicle-to-everything’ (or V2X) infrastructure we have built over 4G to make drivers more aware of potential risks and dangers on the road before they’re able to see it themselves. 

In a connected test vehicle, for example, hard braking could send out an alert of this behaviour to alert nearby vehicles to the danger before existing in-vehicle sensors could detect the problem. Vehicles could also detect red light violations, which are received from vehicles that might be about to enter an active intersection against the light. Cameras mounted on the dashboard of test vehicles could also be connected, and configured to detect pedestrians in intersections, alerting drivers to give way.  

We’ve brought a bit of 5G performance, low latency, into our 4G network for this trial. For the moment, our 4G network has wide area coverage, and so the first hundreds or thousands of cars that use this technology will certainly do that on 4G. What 5G brings is the ability to do this at scale, with many cars on the road all communicating at the same time. What’s great is that uptake of this technology will go hand in hand with the way we’re building 5G coverage, so by the time it’s needed, we’ll have the network built out.

Crucially, we are investing in this project to develop cellular V2X for connected vehicles well before automated vehicles are readily available – making driver safer, easier, more economic and more enjoyable.

This technology is proof that mobile and automotive connectivity developed here in Australia has the ability to help prevent accidents on our roads and to potentially save lives. The strength and speed of our mobile network means Telstra is well placed to support a future where this technology can become a reality.

Our purpose is connecting Australia and building a future where everyone can thrive – and we’re especially proud to work with VicRoads and Lexus in this spirit to make our roads safer.

Growing the entrepreneurial spirit, in Australia and worldwide

Tech and Innovation

Posted on March 28, 2019

3 min read

I’m sure I won’t have a hard time convincing you of the value of entrepreneurialism. This spirit is what drives people to open a new business, to innovate and invent new technology, and invest in those willing to try.

But while we might agree on the incredibly high value of this spirit, we might disagree on the current state of things in Australia and what, if anything, we should do about it.

One of the measures of the future health of our business environment is the quantity and quality of new businesses started each year. On this front, Australia is performing well. When it comes to the rate of technology innovation, though, Australia is not performing nearly as well as it could. According to the 2018 Global Innovation Index, we rank 20th in the world – not a bad result, but we are not as successful as we could be.

What is really interesting is that this report shows we rank 11th in the world when looking at the inputs for innovation – such as the average number of years young people receive formal education, easy access to credit, and a high level of government services being available online – but we rank 31st when looking at outputs like the value of our patents, creation of new goods and services, and our foreign investment outflow.

Clearly something is not working the way it should.

Where were you when the dot-com bubble burst?

It’s almost 20 years since that rise and fall of many companies and the entrepreneurs behind them. While a very small number of people who invested heavily in tech stocks managed to get through that period with their finances intact, the most common outcome was lots of money burned.

Twenty years later the NASDAQ has climbed to all-time highs and is now at over 7,500. Sure the bubble burst, but many technology firms in the US have grown and many new ones have been established. In fact, many of the most successful entrepreneurs of our time were made better by the experience.

For example, Jeff Bezos opened an online bookstore in 1994. It was a disruptive move to take on a saturated market. His often-repeated mantra about being obsessed with providing the best possible customer experience, irrespective of what Amazon was selling and where it was selling it, enabled him to ride out the dot-com bust and build a company that, in 2018, had more than US$232 billion in revenue.

In Australia, the dot com boom gave rise to some serious success stories. REA Group listed on the ASX in December 1999 at $1.11 per share. Today you’d be paying close to $80 per share. Carsales.com was founded in 1997. It listed on the ASX twelve years later and today has a market cap of over $3 billion. And other businesses like Wotif, Lastminute.com, Seek and others have achieved sustainable long-term growth. However, their success has had nowhere near the impact on the Australian economy as technology companies have had in the US.

Tags: 5g, innovation, IoT,