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Moonhack 2018: 24,000 kids learn to code to prepare for the future

Telstra Foundation Technology For Kids

Posted on July 19, 2018

3 min read

Calling all earthlings from Sydney to Seoul, Montreal to Madrid, who’d like to learn more about coding and join 24,000 kids aged 8 – 18 from around the world in a record attempt to get as many kids coding together as possible!

Started by Code Club Australia in 2016, Moonhack is the annual record setter event that aims to get as many kids around the world coding over a 24 hour period, and inspire collaboration and interest in digital technologies.

This year’s event will be held on July 20 to mark the anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing – and we’re looking for more Aussie kids to get involved. To take part, you’ll need a computer with internet access and a passion for discovery. Simply register your interest and prepare for lift off!

Kids can take part in the challenge at home by themselves or in groups as part of a ‘Moonhackathon’.

There are four space-themed projects for kids to choose from and discover how fun, easy and exciting coding is. The projects are generally designed to take 45 minutes to complete, but it will depend on the participant’s level of coding experience.

Why is coding such an important skill for kids to develop?

We believe that all Australian children should be given the opportunity to develop skills in coding and across the fields of Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts and Maths (STEAM) so that they can succeed in a rapidly shifting and technologically focused workforce.

Coding develops skills in critical thinking, persistence and sharpens children’s problem-solving abilities. Coding can also assist in developing children’s skills in mathematics and despite what many people think, coding actually assists in the development of creativity.

What’s the connection to July 20?

On this day nearly 50 years ago, the first humans landed on the moon in the lunar module, ‘Eagle.’ Landing this machine was no easy task; the Mission Commander, Neil Armstrong and the pilot, Buzz Aldrin, had to land the craft softly enough so that it wouldn’t crash – this is actually one of the projects that Moonhack participants can tackle through the challenge.

Surely all the excitement was in America – why are we celebrating this anniversary in Australia?

Our nation played a pivotal role in the moon landing of 1969. Just this past weekend I was in Canberra, where I visited the Deep Space Communication Complex, the antenna known by the name of Deep Space Station 46 which relayed the first television images of Neil Armstrong’s historic first steps the Moon, which is pretty cool!

About Code Club Australia

Code Club has been operating since 2014, thanks to the generous support of their founding partner, the Telstra Foundation. There are now more than 1600 Code Club’s operating around the country. In addition, we have reached more than 100,000 children and empowered more than 500 teachers to deliver a curriculum with a focus on digital technologies education.