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Global products, local pricing

Telstra News

Posted on January 29, 2010

2 min read

Something that has been annoying me for some time is the price differential of identical products between Australia and the United States.

A few months ago I purchased a new Apple MacBook Pro and looked into the cost of their extended warranty product AppleCare. The price in Australia is $419.00. I purchased the same product at the Apple Store, Las Vegas, for $US249 before tax (equal to $A275.85 plus taxes). Of course, before purchasing this extended warranty, I did check it was valid world-wide – which was confirmed in store.

Next I purchased the new Apple Magic Mouse at the Apple Store 5th Avenue, New York. This cost $US69 before tax (equal to $A76.44 plus taxes). The Magic Mouse is $A99 here.

What I want to know is why are we paying more to purchase Apple products in Australia, from Apple (not a dealer), than from Apple in the US? If the products were priced 12 months ago when the Australian dollar was hovering around 64 cents (I still have nightmares thinking what I paid for things January 2009 in New York…), then there may be a justification for the price differences.

We live in a world where the global market is open to anyone with an internet connection. We should not have to put up with this type of pricing inconsistency.

I love to purchase in Australia wherever possible, but why should I pay more for that honour?

I’d be interested in your feedback where you have found an identical product priced in a manner that caused you to purchase it overseas rather than locally. Maybe we can get through to the local representatives and bring about pricing parity.

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