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08 Feb 2013
By John Chambers
Feb
08
2013

Trialling New Network Management Techniques – Myth Buster

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Since our last post discussing our plans to trial new ways of managing our network, there’s been a lot of discussion online and in the media about the potential implications of these plans. Given this, we thought we’d respond to the most common questions that have been raised since our last post in these trials.

What Are We Doing?

  • Telstra will be conducting two trials:
    • Customer Experience Trial which will test what type of speed based or alternatively application based speed-tiered offers Telstra could take to market in future. This trial will be managed through Telstra’s existing market research customer panel. 
    • Traffic Management Trial which will test peak traffic management policies applying to a small group of Victorian ADSL Customers.
  • Detailed customer letters which outline the details of these trials will be distributed to all potential trial participants before they commence.

Why are we undertaking these trials?

  • The network management practices Telstra is trialling are designed to help us to serve our customers better. They are intended to allow us to provide customers with the quality of service that best suits their needs for the lowest possible price.
  • The results of these trials will inform Telstra’s future product and pricing decisions.

Why doesn’t Telstra just invest in more capacity to avoid these issues?

  • We continue to invest in enhancing our networks to ensure our customers enjoy the best possible quality of service.
  • This trial is about testing options to ensure that the investments that we are making are the most efficient way to ensure our customers enjoy the quality of service they demand.
  • As we recently publicly told the ACCC:

“Telstra’s goal is to optimise the customer experience by managing congestion on its ADSL network through price, investment and technical means. Traffic on Telstra’s ADSL network has on average doubled every 12 months for the past four years, driven to a large extent by growth in demand for real time entertainment. Without continued congestion management further growth in traffic will result in more congestion at peak times, negatively impacting on the customer experience.’

  • This trial is simply about examining the potential technical means to assist in this task.

Why is Telstra ‘targeting’ Peer to Peer (P2P) in these trials?

  • Telstra is not targeting one particular form of traffic. We’re testing a range of different options for a range of classes of traffic services under these trials.
  • One of the options being examined under this trial is the shaping of specific services (including some P2P traffic types including Bittorrent) in certain circumstances and within certain times. The key characteristic of Bittorrent peer to peer traffic that is relevant to our network traffic management trials is the fact that most such traffic is not time-critical – for example, compared with VoIP or video streaming – and so might be slowed without significant consumer detriment. Other types of P2P services (eg some gaming services, Skype etc) will not be targeted for shaping this traffic management trial.
  • Our sole objective in this trial is identifying options for improving our network management to ensure that all of our customers enjoy the best quality service for their needs at the best possible price.

Why has Telstra mentioned P2P Copyright infringement in commenting on these trials?

  • Telstra recognises that P2P has a range of legitimate uses.
  • Our blog post on this trial included reference to piracy because of initial media inquiries about the trial which asked about intellectual property infringement.
  • This trial isn’t about piracy, it’s about getting smarter about the way we manage our networks and better matching the characteristics of our products and services with our customers’ diverse needs.
  • Telstra does not condone copyright infringement.  It is an industry issue that has been, and continues to be, the basis for ongoing dialogue among all relevant stakeholders.  Our position on copyright remains the same.

Is Telstra collecting information about copyright infringement as part of this trial?

  • No.
  • This project is solely about testing network management practices to determine if they improve our overall customer service.

Is Telstra throttling P2P traffic at the request of Rights Holders or with the intent of deterring alleged intellectual property infringement?

  • No.

Is Telstra sharing information about alleged copyright infringement with rights holders as part of this trial?

  • No.
  • Telstra’s priority is our customers. Telstra has consistently stated that the only circumstances in which we would (and in fact legally can) identify our customers to third parties is if required to by law.

Are you using Deep Packet Inspection for these Trials? What does this mean?

  • Yes.

Telstra is trialling network measures that allow customised management of different types of traffic on our network. The technology we are using looks at characteristics of the data packet to identify the type of the traffic present. In short, we are looking at the characteristics of each packet to see the type of traffic, but we are not looking at the content. This means while we identify a packet as being for example, P2P, we do not know or record any of the content or information that it contains.

What if I’m not a part of this trial? Will the technology being used in this trial touch my broadband service?

  • No.
  • All individuals whose broadband service may be touched by this trial will be given the opportunity to opt-out if they do not want to be part of the trial.

Do these trials raise ‘Net Neutrality’ issues? Doesn’t Australia need US style ‘Net Neutrality’ laws?

  • The Australian telecommunications landscape is very different to America. The absence of infrastructure access regulation in the United States means that consumers have few alternatives should their ISP adopt network management practices that do not suit their needs.
  • In Australia, access regulation means that customers are able to choose from a large number of ISPs with a wide range of network management practices. Competition will ensures that ISPs offer products with network management practices that best meet customer needs. If an Australian ISP applied network management practices that were not in customers’ interests, these customers would vote with their feet and move to an ISP with different network management practices.
  • In countries with access regimes like Australia’s (eg the UK), regulators have generally not seen a need to regulate these practices as the discipline of the market protects consumer interests.
  • The key issue for policy makers and network operators in the Australian context is ensuring effective transparency of network management practices to allow customers to make an informed choice about the network practices applied to the services they buy.
  • Telstra is committed to giving our customers all the information they need to choose products and services with the characteristics that best meet their needs.

Is Telstra prioritising its own traffic over that of other content providers in these trials?

  • No.

Do these trials raise privacy issues?

  • This trial does not involve any monitoring or tracking of websites visited by our customers, and the trial’s findings, including customer feedback, will be collected in accordance with our Privacy Statement and all Australian Privacy Laws.

What data is Telstra collecting about users in these trials?

  • Customers will be surveyed during the trial to help determine their usage experience which will be used to determine the suitability of adopting such practices.

This trial does not involve any monitoring or tracking of websites visited by our customers, and the trial’s findings, including customer feedback, will be collected in accordance with our Privacy Statement and all Australian privacy laws.

I’ve paid for ‘x’ gigabytes under my Telstra plan, aren’t I entitled to use them?

  • Yes.
  • It is important to remember that these trials will only affect a limited number of customers for a limited period of time. If you are not part of the trial your service will not be affected. Customers will be able to opt out at any time during the course of the trial. Customers who do participate in the trials and complete the surveys will receive a rebate on their monthly plan.
  • Regardless, none of the options being tested in these trials would prevent any customer from utilising their full data usage entitlement. Some of the options being considered would affect the speed of data consumption for the use of particular services in particular circumstances, but in no case would these options prevent a customer from using their full data usage entitlement.

By

Posts: 10

36 Comments

  1. John says:

    You final part covering ‘I’ve paid for ‘x’ gigabytes under my Telstra plan, aren’t I entitled to use them?’

    So you are saying we still have the full usage available to us but that parts of the service we use may be slowed.

    What about answering…

    “I paid for ‘x’ gigabytes and currently I can access that at my full speed being ‘y’ Mb’s, if I remain in my allocated data as per my plan I pay for, surely I am entitled to use that data at the full speed without any throttling.”

    Or will you offer a cheaper plan which includes some services throttled?

    • GiantDave says:

      Absolutely. I caught on to this as well.
      TelStra, if you do implement a speed restriction on certain services following the trial (even though you contradict yourself here by saying that P2P services are not being targeted), you are gong to need to offer a second tier of service that does not restrict speed.

      It simply will not stand if advertising starts saying:
      Average speeds will be lower and actual speeds vary due to a number of factors including network configuration, line quality and length, your exchange, your location, internet traffic, your equipment and software AND WHERE TELSTRA DEEMS THE DATA BEING ACCESSED IS DETRIMENTAL TO NORMAL NETWORK PERFORMANCE. THIS DECISION IS PURELY AT TELSTRA DISCRETION.

      There is going to have to be absolute transparency on what Telstras policy is on what data is deemed to be conducive of congestion and the criteria for deciding this. As a customer I will expect to know what data is being slowed and how Telstra assesses that the data I am accessing falls into the criteria.

    • John Chambers says:

      John, your question “Or will you offer a cheaper plan which includes some services throttled?” That is something we would consider, again the trial is all about lookinhg at how these kinds of plans would resonate with customers. John

  2. Mark Newton says:

    John, perhaps you could expand on this:

    The technology we are using looks at characteristics of the data packet to identify the type of the traffic present. In short, we are looking at the characteristics of each packet to see the type of traffic, but we are not looking at the content. This means while we identify a packet as being for example, P2P, we do not know or record any of the content or information that it contains.

    As someone who is pretty knowledgable about how DPI works, I reckon the statement I quoted above is 100% dead wrong. DPI equipment is designed to inspect the packet content, and use information thus gained to make queuing and switching decisions.

    When I send Telstra an IP packet, I expect them to look no further than the layer-3 header, so it can use the source IP address for reverse path filtering and the destination IP address to switch the packet to its destination.

    Everything past the layer-3 header is “payload,” otherwise known as, “content,” the bits referred to in section 6(1) of the Telecommunications (Interception and Access) Act 1979 in the part of the Act which defines the offense provision that can send violators to jail for up to two years.

    The “D” in “DPI” means that it goes beyond layer-3. That is how these systems work.

    In the same way that you were inspecting content to extract URLs during your disastrous SmartControls deployment six months ago, I think you’re inspecting content here too.

    Please clarify your position: Inside a given IP packet, where does Telstra believe “the content” begins? And which subclause of section 7 of the TIAA does Telstra believe will apply when the trial is complete and DPI equipment is deployed more widely?

    -- mark

  3. Mark Newton says:

    And on an unrelated, non-technical point:

    Why does Telstra keep behaving like this? It’s downright big-brother spooky to watch a telco take such a massive proprietary interest in the private communications of its customers.

    As a company, you used to know that. You would never, for example, employ crack teams of evesdroppers to wiretap subscribers calls to see if you can extract information from conversations which you could use to improve your business model. You used to know that that kind of behaviour was totally beyond the pale.

    Yet when it comes to the internet, that kind of behaviour is supposed to be totally okay, and everyone is supposed to adjust their expectations of privacy so you can squeeze more margin out of your ADSL backhaul networks?

    Is that really the kind of company you’ve turned in to? Seriously?

    -- mark

  4. Legless says:

    I’ve been one of the more voracious critics of this shaping over on Whirlpool. But, on reading that, I’m happier now.

    Offering more plans, at a lower cost, that include certain types of traffic shaping sounds like decent idea. As long as you don’t increase the price of your current all-you-can-eat plans.

    Users would get to choose, a lot would go for the lower cost plans and your premium users would be be happy.

    win-win

    Cheers

  5. Daniel says:

    John,

    Why are you running this trial when you know very well the data collected will be absolutely void of any meaning.

    Let me put it into context with a quote from a pretty smart guy around the ISP scene which kinda puts what you plan to do into perspective:

    “We’ll shape P2P traffic, but any customers that could be affected by that can opt out.
    Customers that aren’t affected can stay in the trial.
    - That’ll give us some quality data.”

    See a problem with that?

    • John Chambers says:

      Daniel, we will provide incentives to participate so that we can include customers of all shapes and sizes. cheers John

  6. jason andrade says:

    The last point needs clarification.

    If you affect the speed of data consumption then you will in some cases prevent a customer using their full data usage entitlement.

    It seems disingenuous to suggest there are no cases under which this could happen.

    regards,

    -jason

    • John Chambers says:

      jason, no intent to be disingenuous. Wording was designed to clarify the intent of trial, which is to create best possible customer experiences during busy network periods (not to reduce customer total usage amounts). John

  7. George Michaelson says:

    I think that the statement “In countries with access regimes like Australia’s (eg the UK), regulators have generally not seen a need to regulate these practices as the discipline of the market protects consumer interests.” is possibly disingenuous.

    It is true that in a reductionist sense, the open market we have, and other (european, predominantly) markets have in ICT have not necessitated this kind of regulation.

    It is also true that as consumers, we might yet need the defence of a declared regulatory intervention, and that market dominance, and relationships between content and carriage (which in the case of foxtel, cannot be said to be completely of no relevance to Australia, since this name explicitly invokes the joint-venture nature of fox and telstra)

    So good on you for addressing it, but no. This does not mean it has no relevance now, or in the future.

  8. Brendan Sherrin says:

    I disagree with the statement made above:

    “. The key characteristic of Bittorrent peer to peer traffic that is relevant to our network traffic management trials is the fact that most such traffic is not time-critical”

    This is incorrect…

    P2P traffic is as varied as the rest of internet traffic everywhere. Blizzard Entertainment uses it for patches for software such as Starcraft, World of Warcraft etc. Other software makers use it for patch distribution as well.

    Bittorrent is currently testing live streaming of videos/TV (live.bittorrent.com), will you discriminate against this technology before it hits mainstream use? This then begs of the question of wether Telstra will be breaching competition law by discriminating against a competitor (Telstra offers Bigpond movie/TV downloads). I think you’ll be risking ACCC complaints by going down this path..

    Cheers,
    Brendan

    • John Chambers says:

      Brendan, we do understand there are a variety of traffic types with different characteristics. Hence why we are seeking to trial options that work most effectively across them. John

  9. Michael says:

    A far less balanced response than I’ve seen on other forums but let me weigh in…

    What most people who are complaining seem to forget is that available bandwidth is not infinite. Does Telstra have plenty of bandwidth? Yes. Is Telstra selling that bandwidth profitably? Undoubtedly yes. Is the amount of bandwidth they have available growing at a fast enough rate to cater for the growth in consumer consumption? Hell No! And that’s the point that is being made. Mass consumer consumption of data is far more than doubling each year and if actions aren’t taken, we’ll wind up in the same boat we were in shortly after ADSL came out (where up to 80:1 contention ratios were not uncommon in some areas) with massive congestion issues. We are already starting to see this in many regional areas (anyone here from the Central Coast?) and the pithy answer “well Telstra should just run in more bandwidth” just doesn’t fly.

    Chambers is quite correct in focusing on time-sensitive and non-time sensitive traffic as a means of demarcation. Both those traffic types are growing exponentially for completely different reasons and thus have to be addressed very differently.

    Time sensitive traffic is growing mainly due to the growth of legitimate IP-TV/IP-Movie services which chew up horrendous amounts of bandwidth when delivering HD or full HD content. Video Conferencing is also on the move, particularly with decent VC clients being built right into people’s television sets and this is also a big bye muncher. VoIP is also growing exponentially, and it’s probably the most sensitive traffic of all but at least each session consumes a relatively miniscule amount of bandwidth.

    Non time sensitive traffic is pretty much everything not delivered in real-time and this is growing just as quickly. The traditional culprits of Email, P2P and software patching have been joined by monsters like full software distribution (e.g. Steam, every single Linux distro, etc.) and online storage (e.g. Dropbox, Skydrive, etc.). These all demand vast amounts of bandwidth and will take all they can get.

    The purpose of traffic shaping of any sort from a carrier perspective is to ensure the reliable delivery of the first sort of traffic at the expense (albeit as minimal as possible) of the second. That is not a blow against Net Neutrality, that is Net Sanity and is what is practiced on pretty much every business network in the world (we usually just call it QoS though that’s again an oversimplification).

    That Telstra is looking to deal with these issues now, before people start getting juttery video and dropped phone calls, shows that they are planning for future demands, not that they are “screwing everyone over”. Most ISPs do it, some tell as about it and other don’t but ultimately, the only alternative to traffic shaping will be crappy real-time content for all users (taking us back to 2001-2002).

    By the way, comments about DPI being a breach of the Telecommunications act are both wrong and invidious. DPI can be used in this fashion if the content inspected is logged and those logs are reviewed but that is not is what is being proposed (and to do so without notification would indeed certainly qualify as unlawful surveillance). The legitimate use of a DPI traffic shaper is to determine traffic types through pattern recognition (Procera calls this “Brown Logic”) and then enforce policy upon those patterns. A proper DPI will be able to tell the difference (for example) between P2P file sharing and P2P media streaming as they have different patterns. No human intervention will be required in order for the device to do its job which -- if done as described by Mr Chambers -- is to ensure that sensitive traffic doesn’t get impacted by non-sensitive traffic.

    • Drainus says:

      this is a brilliant post. its filled in gaps in what i thought i knew and will hopefully educate more worried customers and alleviate their concerns, not to mention reduce the inaccurate mentions of privacy invasion.

  10. GiantDave says:

    I love it when people contradict themselves in sequential paragraphs:

    “Telstra is not targeting one particular form of traffic”
    then 2 sentences later
    “One of the options being examined under this trial is the shaping of specific services in certain circumstances and within certain times.”

    So essentially what is being said here is don’t worry, we aren’t targeting any particular form of traffic, we are selectively shaping specific services.

    Apparently there is a difference?

    • John Chambers says:

      GiantDave you seem to have misunderstood me. Many people assume this trial is about P2P traffic, all day every day. Incorrect -- hence “Telstra is not targeting one particular form of traffic”. We are looking at ways to optimise the experiences of our customers in busy periods across many traffic types, hence “the shaping of specific services in certain circumstances and within certain times”. Hope that helps. John

  11. Nick says:

    I do not really see the problem with this.

    People seem to be missing that this is only a trial, it is not solely targeting P2P and it is only being trialled during peak demand periods.

    During peak times telstra may slow non time critical data so that time critical data like VoIP can travel without being impacted or slowed.

    Consider 400 people all connected to the same exchange who all want to download a movie (legal or not) when they get home from work at around 6PM.
    If all of those people have 20Mbit ADSL2 then that can saturate a 1 Gigabyte connection to the exchange.
    If this is the only connection that the exchange has then this will mean that for all other people their internet experience will be sub standard. (Think of trying to use your mobile phone on New Years Eve or at a large concert)

    If telstra processes this traffic at the lowest priority then they can temporarily reduce the speed of this traffic when other people want to use a service such as VoIP/Skype or send an email which works best when it is processed as a higher priority.

    As a solution, have your computer download the movie while you are at work or while you sleep, these are not peak times so your transfer will not be slowed.

  12. Brendan says:

    “What if I’m not a part of this trial? Will the technology being used in this trial touch my broadband service?

    All individuals whose broadband service may be touched by this trial will be given the opportunity to opt-out if they do not want to be part of the trial.”

    So only those people not going to be affected will participate. Great idea, lets exclude the impacted people, conduct a trial and claim it was success then role it out to everyone. What an awesome idea.

  13. John says:

    Good post Telstra. I’m one of the people that don’t instinctively trust you as a company because of the way you’ve behaved in the past, and you’ll be paying for those mistakes for a while, but you are changing. Continuing this transparency and open dialogues is one of the best things you can do as a company. As much as I want to hate Telstra, all my experiences in the past year or so have been positive. My reading of the comments are that people are worried about throttling and limitations, whereas I’m reading the trial is more about prioritisation.

    At the end of the day, customers get worried because they are locked into a contract and they’re worried they’re no longer going to get what they signed up for. I don’t know how you could have an escape hatch for those that decide changes to your service aren’t what they wanted, but it would certainly build trust and allow you to ask customers to give a little trust to evaluate whether the service meets their needs or expectations. Good luck.

  14. Dick McDermott says:

    You start fiddling with what I can and can’t do with a product I purchased in good faith and I will be out of this contract faster than you can imagine after obtaining legal advice on what constitutes a binding contract and what activities later imposed by the provider invalidate that contract.

    • Nick says:

      If you bothered to read the contract that YOU signed then you would know that:
      *
         What is the BigPond ADSL service?
      2.1  The BigPond ADSL service is a broadband service which gives you:
         (a) access to the world wide web, BigPond Broadband web hosting services, email service and global newsgroups;
         (b) the ability to upload and download files to and from the global internet using the file transfer protocol;
         (c‍) access to Telnet and native HTTP access to global gopher services; and
         (d) other services we may advise to you from time to time.
      *

      (from Part C – ADSL in the BigPond Service section of Our Customer Terms)

      By implementing DPI or slowing of a particular service during peak times Telstra are still providing you with the ADSL service which you agreed to receive.
      This will do nothing to invalidate the contract.

  15. Stephen says:

    Will adding the DPI filter affect game lag?

    Why don’t you change to off-peak plans instead? Reduce peak download allowance to get people to download in off-peak times? This seems like an easy solution, unless there is another reason for using DPI.

    Will you be adding cheaper internet plans that have DPI targeted advertising, like they do in the USA?

  16. Martin says:

    Here’s a question or two for you John.

    If your so worried about band width then why on earth did Telstra offer those Mega download plans to start with?

    As as YOU have said and I quote “the network traffic is growing at double the amount for the past four years”.

    Yet you have sat on your hands all that time and didn’t expand your network enough even though paraphrasing your own words we saw this coming and all the while still selling these mega plans.

    Is this just greed? Or are you and I assume not, just being stupid?

    Now you want to do this trial to make the “Telstra customer experience better”. Really, John !

    Don’t change the rules of the game just because you didn’t do the work to win that game.

    Myself and many other “Telstra customers experience” was just fine, You offered Megabytes and service we paid good money for it. Win Win.

    I leave with some good advice from my third grade teacher he said “Failing to plan is planning to fail”

    Don’t make loyal customers pay for your failing.

    • Nick says:

      This has nothing to do with your so called “mega” plans.

      Just because Bigpond has offered larger plans in the past does not mean those plans are responsible for the increase in data consumption.
      In fact the increase in data consumption by consumers would have caused Bigpond to introduce the larger plans.

      Very rapidly consumers have wanted to consume more data through internet connected TVs, smart phones, tablets, photo frames and so on. Look at the uptake of internet connected devices over the past several years and it will likely closely resemble the increased demand for bandwidth and data consumption.

      Looking at the plans, 500GB (500,000 Megabytes) on ADSL 2, say you can connect at 20 Megabit and can reliably download at 2 Megabytes per second.
      Over the course of the month (30.4 days) you could download 5,259,480 Megabytes.
      That is 10.3 times your monthly usage allowance.
      So slowing your speed for a few hours really is not going to impact on your ability to consume all of the data which you paid for.

      I dont know what the peak times are, lets assume they are 3PM to 9PM so 6 hours.
      Now during this time lets assume your speed is slowed to 10 Megabit
      This gives you a daily average speed of 17.5 Megabit for the day, call it 1.75 Megabytes per second
      At this speed you could download 4,602,045 Megabytes in a month. This is still 9.2 times your monthly allowance.

      However telstra is not going to flat out reduce the speed of your internet connection for the peak time, they are only going to slow the transfer of non time critical services so time critical services can flow uninterrupted.

      In fact all telstra needs to allow you to consume 500GB of data is offer you a 1.557 Megabit/second plan and if they simply offered this speed to every consumer on a 500GB plan there would be no need for them to trial that they are trialling. However as a consumer you do not want to consume your 500GB evenly in a way which is even, you want to consume it when you are at home and not sleeping, in peak times.
      So you therefore demand a speed which is much greater and could theoretically allow you to consume over 10 times the data you have paid for and offering this speed to every consumer is not easily achievable or cheap. This applied to every ISP, not just Telstra. (See below for another explanation of this)

      If you do not think Telstra is expending their networks to cope with the increased demand then look at their mobile network.
      4G was introduced not long ago and they are already now testing Class 4 4G devices which offer greater speed. Why? Because the faster you can access the internet on a mobile device the less time you are connected to the phone tower transferring data, slowing other people down.
      If telstra was not interested in expending their network they would simply wait until the next technology came out rather than invest in allocating more spectrum and take a smaller step from Class 3 4G to Class 4 4G

      This post from Whirlpool I think explains one of the problems with providing an internet service
      ***
      I knew this topic would spark a lot of debate, I’m in an odd position myself in that i work within the Telco industry so i see all the costs associated with delivering any service to a customer.

      I find the situation very similar to the power industry who supply power and the apparent gold plating of the power network, like the power network there are very big peaks in demand for the network, congestion is similar to a brown out on the power network not enough to meet the demand.

      Think it like this.

      1 Customer 500GB quota to deliver that over the entire month (28 days) i require
      17.85 GB per day
      0.74 GB per hour

      0.20 MB per second
      1.65 mbit per second

      I can tell you that the wholesale costs to provide you with just 1.65mbit is greater than your monthly bill. Add to that i still need to add transmission and tail costs. The numbers don’t add up.

      It gets worse because customers don’t use the bandwidth averaged over the month. They use it mostly during the peak times. Lets say peak times are 6pm-12pm (6 hours 25% of the day) to provide all of that 500GB in just those hours i now need 6.6mbit per customer.

      So i buy 6.6mbit but it only gets used 25% of the time, i still have to pay for the 6.6mbit to be able to handle the data during peak only.

      It can’t get worse can it, but it can. What are our access speeds 2>24mbit for DSL and ~100mbit for cable.

      The users now expect that they should be able to use all that access speed whenever they want, i’ve already said it costs more than your monthly bill to provide the minimum required, how the hell do i provide 100mbit whenever you want it? At a cost less than you have given me?
      http://forums.whirlpool.net.au/forum-replies.cfm?t=2052528&p=15&#r286

  17. Jack Francis says:

    Taking into account your statement about this trial and other well-informed viewpoints in the comments I can’t help but think that John Lindsay, CTO at iiNet, statement is closer to the real reason behind this Telstra move. He stated it’s purely a business decision to avoid upgrading its ADSL network and introducing ‘boiling-the-frog’ throttling to its customer base. He also suggested Telstra get rid of its 500GB plans and have a max of 100GB plans in order to shift big users away from the company which would free up areas of this congestion. As others have quite rightly pointed out if a customer takes and pays for a certain amount bandwidth they are entitled to use all of that bandwidth without restriction.

    Regards,

    • Nick says:

      >CTO at iiNet also suggested Telstra get rid of its 500GB plans and have a max of 100GB plans in order to shift big users away from the company

      That is coming from the CTO of a competing company who knows if Telstra was to drop the higher level plans that the users would be forced to move to another ISP and if iiNet happens to offer those plans they could potentially increase their subscribers.

  18. Jack Francis says:

    Taking into account your statement about this trial and other well-informed viewpoints in the comments I can’t help but think that John Lindsay, CTO at iiNet, statement is closer to the real reason behind this Telstra move. He stated it’s purely a business decision to avoid upgrading its ADSL network and introducing ‘boiling-the-frog’ throttling to its customer base. He also suggested Telstra get rid of its 500GB plans and have a max of 100GB plans in order to shift big users away from the company which would then free up areas of this congestion. No?

    As others have quite rightly pointed out if a customer takes and pays for a certain amount bandwidth they are entitled to use all of that bandwidth without restriction.

    Regards,
    Jack

  19. Wade says:

    I’ve been put on this trial and did not receive a letter or email in regards to get off it. I’ve bee on the phone for the last 3 days to tech support, iTAM and complaints. Only one person in all of those departments actually knew this trial was going on, however he didn’t have the phone number to call to get myself taken off this trial.

    If anbody has it, can you please send it too acans@bigpond.com ?

    I’m sick of my world of warcraft updating at 5 -- 10kbs

    • Gigi [Telstra Staff] says:

      Hi Wade,

      The trial has not yet commenced. If you’re experiencing slower than normal speeds I recommend you speak to Bigpond Tech Support on 133 933.

  20. John chambers says:

    Nick I appreciate your balanced comments here. John

  21. Nir Cohen says:

    Can you please provide more details on the vendors taking part in this trial?

    Thanks

  22. Mike says:

    Just more corporate spin on what is a pile of the proverbial -- I would have thought it would be a case of “I pay for a service, which provides me a set amount of data per month at acceptable speeds”, rather than a case of “we’ve oversold capacity on our network, let’s spin this”.

    Just as well Telstra’s shaping is hilariously easy to get around….

  23. David says:

    how do i opt out ?
    and why was i opt-in in the first place ?

    • Jamie (Editor) says:

      Hi David,

      This trial actually finished some time ago, but those who did take part were invited to be part of it.

      I hope this helps clarify :)

      Thanks,
      Jamie

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